Archive for February, 2010

Are There Any Studies on the Link Between Talcum Powder and Ovarian Cancer?

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Q: Is there any recent medical studies that show a link between talcum powder use and an increased risk for ovarian cancer?

A: Yes, here is one led by Dr. Margaret Gates and funded by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health, found 36-41% increase in ovarian cancer from talc use and advised women to immediately stop using the product.

Ovarian Cancer – Study Finds Talcum Powder Link
Every day, besides our food, we use dozens of different cosmetics, powders, lotions, pastes, soaps, shampoos, etc on our bodies. Yet many of us are not aware, or simply cannot be bothered, of the fact that there are hundreds, even thousands of harmful chemicals in these daily products.
Most of these chemicals have not even been tested for safety of use on humans. And, generally speaking, our bodies are “organic”, and do not like chemicals and substances which are synthetic, artificial or man-made; our bodies are just not adapted to properly dealing with such compounds.
Frequent Use of Talcum Powder Near Private Parts May Cause Ovarian Cancer
According to a latest study conducted at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, women who used talcum powder around their private parts daily have a 40% higher risk of getting ovarian cancer. Even those who only used it once a week experienced a 36% higher risk. Although concerns over the use of talc had previously already been surfaced through other studies, these latest figures obtained suggest that the risks are much higher than thought before.
Details of Study
For this Harvard study, researchers looked at data from two previous studies, the New England Case-Control Study (NECC) and the Nurses Health
Study (NHS), to try and locate a link between the use of talcum powder on the genitals and the risk of contracting ovarian cancer. They also tried to
see how certain genetic factors might affect this risk.
All in all, the cases of over 3,000 women were studied, with 1,385 of them having had ovarian cancer and another 1,802 women not having contracted the disease. Both the previous studies had collated information on talc use by the women, including how frequently they used it and on which areas of the body.
The study was led by Dr Margaret A. Gates and funded by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health.
Findings of the Study
The key finding of the Harvard study was the significantly higher risk – 1.4 times – of getting ovarian cancer for those who used talc daily. Correlation
was also noted between more regular usage of talc with the development of serious and invasive cancer. Note that the findings of this study relate
only to the use of talcum powder near the genitals, and do not apply to use on the rest of the body.
Further findings from the study was that women who have the gene glutathione S-transferase M1, or GSTM1, but do not have the gene S-transferase
T1 ( GSTT1), had almost three times as high the risk of developing tumors. This genetic combination is believed to be present in about 10% of
Caucasian women. Women who were only lacking the gene GSTT1 also had a higher cancer risk. This higher risk also applied when the study team considered serious, invasive cancer, which is one of the three main types of ovarian cancer.
According to the study team, extensive research had been previously carried out and some studies have found “modest association” between talc use
on the genital area and higher risk of ovarian cancer. And this association has been controversial, because of factors such as “a lack of a clear dose-response with increasing frequency or duration of talc use, the possibility of confounding or other biases, and the uncertain biological mechanism”.
And because the latest study provides an observed dose-response – higher talc use frequency being linked with greater ovarian cancer risk, including
for serious invasive cancer – the research team feels that their findings give further support to the long-held idea that genital exposure to talcum
powder increases the risk of ovarian cancer.
As for the findings on the effects of different genes, the study’s findings suggest that one’s biological response to talcum powder may be affected by genes which are involved in its detoxification pathways.
The study team had hypothesized that, because talc, which is made through crushing, drying, and then milling of a mineral called hydrous magnesium silicate, has similar chemical properties to asbestos, it was possible that the same molecular and genetic pathways could play a part in the body’s ability to cope with these substances. Specific combinations or variations in certain genes would mean that a person was less able to metabolize or detoxify carcinogens – it would then follow that these people should have a higher risk of ovarian cancer with increased talc exposure.
Asbestos is known to cause a deadly form of lung cancer.
Limitations of Study
It is important to note that the said study, which was published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, has a few limitations. Firstly, the two studies which it drew data from had different methods of data collection. Also, the participants of the NHS study were also only asked
once on their talc usage, and they might thus not have been classified correctly.
In addition, it is not really possible to be sure if exposure to talc had in fact preceded ovarian cancer diagnosis, i.e. that the use of talcum powder
played a part in the development of the disease.
While some factors, such as age, use of oral contraceptives, body mass index and menopausal status, were taken into account and adjusted for, there are probably also some other important ovarian cancer risk factors which were not accounted for.
Does talcum powder really increase ovarian cancer risk?
Each year, more than 6,000 women in the United Kingdom are diagnosed with ovarian cancer. In the United States, more than 20,000 women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2004, while more than 14,700 died from the disease that year.
Some risk factors, besides general lifestyle and dietary habits, include family history, being overweight, use of hormone replacement therapy, relatively earlier start of menses, and having already been diagnosed with breast cancer.
Despite the limitations of the Harvard study, when we look at the overall scheme of things, and put its findings alongside the evidence which had been provided by previous studies, it does appear that talc use is linked to ovarian cancer.
For example, laboratory tests had previously already shown that ovarian cells exposed to talc tend to multiply more rapidly, which is something very characteristic of malignancy. But there had been no clear evidence to affirm scientists’ fear that particles could actually move along a woman’s reproductive tract such a distance, from the genitals all the way to the ovaries. However, in 2007, doctors at Harvard Medical School found small powdered particles in the pelvis area of a woman with late-stage ovarian cancer. The woman was 68 years old and had used talcum powder everyday
for the past 30 years or so.
What Next
At the end of a long hard day at work, take a warm, relaxing bath, dry yourself, and then sprinkle on some talcum powder to feel even better. That is probably what some of us do.
However, based on evidence available so far, Gates has advised women to avoid using talcum powder in the genital area until more research has been carried out.
But would that be overreacting? Dr Jodie Moffat of Cancer Research UK reminded us “it is important to remember that very few women who use talcum powder will ever develop ovarian cancer”. The website of the American Cancer Society echoes this, stating that “only a very small minority of women
who have used talcum powder will ever develop ovarian cancer”.
About half the people reading this article will never get ovarian cancer, not because they are immune to cancer, but because they do not have ovaries. But it is still a stark reminder of how many common and seemingly harmless everyday items in our lives today are adding to our risk of many diseases.
The cleaner and more natural we can get, the safer we will be.
As far as the use of talcum powder goes, while more conclusive research may still be needed, in the meantime, women will have a decision to make.
Main Sources
Women warned of talcum powder cancer risk (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/health/3091174/Women-warned-of-talcum-powder-cancer-risk.html)
Talcum powder and ovarian cancer (http://www.nhs.uk/news/2008/09September/Pages/Talcumpowderrisk.aspx)

According to a latest study conducted at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, “women who used talcum powder around their private parts daily have a 40% higher risk of getting ovarian cancer. Even those who only used it once a week experienced a 36% higher risk. Although concerns over the use of talc had previously already been surfaced through other studies, these latest figures obtained suggest that the risks are much higher than thought before.”

Findings of the Study

Talcum powder use by woman creates a significantly higher risk for developing ovarian cancer – 1.4 times higher. * Note that the findings of this study relate only to the use of talcum powder near the genitals, and do not apply to use on the rest of the body.

According to the study team, extensive research had been previously carried out and some studies have found “modest association” between talc use on the genital area and higher risk of ovarian cancer.

And because the latest study provides an observed dose-response – higher talc use frequency being linked with greater ovarian cancer risk, including for serious invasive cancer – the research team feels that their findings give further support to the long-held idea that genital exposure to talcum powder increases the risk of ovarian cancer.

Call for a free case review with the law firm that filed the very first talcum powder lawsuit. Call 1 (866) 952-1422.

Is Talc Safe For Babies?

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Q: I have been using it on my newborn when I change her diaper. A friend told me this is unsafe. Is this really true?

A: There are more natural talcum powder substitutes such as corn starch. Talc has been linked to ovarian cancer in women who have used talcum powder when changing their baby’s diaper. Many parents are switching to the use of ointments as talcum powder contains many various combinations of zinc stearate, magnesium silicates, as well as other silicates which are finely ground. The size of these particles make it easily inhaled and can reach even the smallest areas of the lung.

There have been numerous reports of babies having life-threatening episodes from inhaling the powder. And in fact, there have been many deaths reported from aspiration of the powder. A good number of these cases occurred during a diaper change when adult supervision is usually very high.

So, clearly talc can cause pneumonia, inflammation (or swelling) of the airways of babies, and even death. But what about cancer? When the link to asbestos and cancer came to light, it was noticed that a lot of the exposure to asbestos was accompanied by other inhalable fibers and dust including talc. However, a specific link to talc exposure and lung cancer has not been established. On the other hand, there has been some interesting research into a possible link of talc to ovarian cancer.

For a number of years now, epidemiologists (scientists who try to establish cause and effect relationships in diseases) have been interested in trying to find some link to the environment and ovarian cancer. Some of their focus has been on talc powder because it is a product that is commonly used in the groin area by women. Several of these studies have shown a possible link between talc powder use and ovarian cancer while other studies have not. One interesting study published in 1996 was done by examining the ovaries of women who had had them removed for reasons other than ovarian cancer. In that study, talc powder was found in all the ovaries including the ones from women did not use talc powder on themselves. This suggests that talc powder could reach the ovaries of women who use talc powder on their babies.

Call for a free case review with the law firm that filed the very first talcum powder lawsuit. Call 1 (866) 952-1422.

Frequent Use of Talcum Powder Near Private Parts May Cause Ovarian Cancer

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

(NaturalNews) According to a latest study conducted at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, women who used talcum powder around their private parts daily have a 40% higher risk of getting ovarian cancer. Even those who only used it once a week experienced a 36% higher risk. Although concerns over the use of talc had previously already been surfaced through other studies, these latest figures obtained suggest that the risks are much higher than thought before.
Details of Study

For this Harvard study, researchers looked at data from two previous studies, the New England Case-Control Study (NECC) and the Nurses Health Study (NHS), to try and locate a link between the use of talcum powder on the genitals and the risk of contracting ovarian cancer. They also tried to see how certain genetic factors might affect this risk.

All in all, the cases of over 3,000 women were studied, with 1,385 of them having had ovarian cancer and another 1,802 women not having contracted the disease. Both the previous studies had collated information on talc use by the women, including how frequently they used it and on which areas of the body.

The study was led by Dr Margaret A. Gates and funded by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

Findings of the Study

The key finding of the Harvard study was the significantly higher risk – 1.4 times – of getting ovarian cancer for those who used talc daily. Correlation was also noted between more regular usage of talc with the development of serious and invasive cancer. Note that the findings of this study relate only to the use of talcum powder near the genitals, and do not apply to use on the rest of the body.

Further findings from the study was that women who have the gene glutathione S-transferase M1, or GSTM1, but do not have the gene S-transferase T1 ( GSTT1), had almost three times as high the risk of developing tumors. This genetic combination is believed to be present in about 10% of Caucasian women. Women who were only lacking the gene GSTT1 also had a higher cancer risk. This higher risk also applied when the study team considered serious, invasive cancer, which is one of the three main types of ovarian cancer.

According to the study team, extensive research had been previously carried out and some studies have found “modest association” between talc use on the genital area and higher risk of ovarian cancer. And this association has been controversial, because of factors such as “a lack of a clear dose-response with increasing frequency or duration of talc use, the possibility of confounding or other biases, and the uncertain biological mechanism”.

And because the latest study provides an observed dose-response – higher talc use frequency being linked with greater ovarian cancer risk, including for serious invasive cancer – the research team feels that their findings give further support to the long-held idea that genital exposure to talcum powder increases the risk of ovarian cancer.

As for the findings on the effects of different genes, the study’s findings suggest that one’s biological response to talcum powder may be affected by genes which are involved in its detoxification pathways.

The study team had hypothesized that, because talc, which is made through crushing, drying, and then milling of a mineral called hydrous magnesium silicate, has similar chemical properties to asbestos, it was possible that the same molecular and genetic pathways could play a part in the body’s ability to cope with these substances. Specific combinations or variations in certain genes would mean that a person was less able to metabolize or detoxify carcinogens – it would then follow that these people should have a higher risk of ovarian cancer with increased talc exposure.

Asbestos is known to cause a deadly form of lung cancer.

Limitations of Study

It is important to note that the said study, which was published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, has a few limitations. Firstly, the two studies which it drew data from had different methods of data collection. Also, the participants of the NHS study were also only asked once on their talc usage, and they might thus not have been classified correctly.

In addition, it is not really possible to be sure if exposure to talc had in fact preceded ovarian cancer diagnosis, i.e. that the use of talcum powder played a part in the development of the disease.

While some factors, such as age, use of oral contraceptives, body mass index and menopausal status, were taken into account and adjusted for, there are probably also some other important ovarian cancer risk factors which were not accounted for.

Does talcum powder really increase ovarian cancer risk?

Each year, more than 6,000 women in the United Kingdom are diagnosed with ovarian cancer. In the United States, more than 20,000 women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2004, while more than 14,700 died from the disease that year.

Some risk factors, besides general lifestyle and dietary habits, include family history, being overweight, use of hormone replacement therapy, relatively earlier start of menses, and having already been diagnosed with breast cancer.

Despite the limitations of the Harvard study, when we look at the overall scheme of things, and put its findings alongside the evidence which had been provided by previous studies, it does appear that talc use is linked to ovarian cancer.

For example, laboratory tests had previously already shown that ovarian cells exposed to talc tend to multiply more rapidly, which is something very characteristic of malignancy. But there had been no clear evidence to affirm scientists’ fear that particles could actually move along a woman’s reproductive tract such a distance, from the genitals all the way to the ovaries. However, in 2007, doctors at Harvard Medical School found small powdered particles in the pelvis area of a woman with late-stage ovarian cancer. The woman was 68 years old and had used talcum powder everyday for the past 30 years or so.

What Next

At the end of a long hard day at work, take a warm, relaxing bath, dry yourself, and then sprinkle on some talcum powder to feel even better. That is probably what some of us do.

However, based on evidence available so far, Gates has advised women to avoid using talcum powder in the genital area until more research has been carried out.

But would that be overreacting? Dr Jodie Moffat of Cancer Research UK reminded us “it is important to remember that very few women who use talcum powder will ever develop ovarian cancer”. The website of the American Cancer Society echoes this, stating that “only a very small minority of women who have used talcum powder will ever develop ovarian cancer”.

About half the people reading this article will never get ovarian cancer, not because they are immune to cancer, but because they do not have ovaries. But it is still a stark reminder of how many common and seemingly harmless everyday items in our lives today are adding to our risk of many diseases. The cleaner and more natural we can get, the safer we will be.

As far as the use of talcum powder goes, while more conclusive research may still be needed, in the meantime, women will have a decision to make.

Ovarian cancer risk noted in talcum powder use near the vagina

Saturday, February 13th, 2010

Women’s health has several unique issues: problems of menstruation, child bearing, hormonal and other gynaecological diseases. The most worrisome is cancer. Certain cancers are unique to women like cervical cancer, ovarian and uterine cancer. B reast cancer, though it occurs in men also, is mainly seen in women.

Ovarian cancer usually develops in women over 50 years though some kinds develop in younger women. The risk factors are family history, or women who have had breast/uterus/colon cancer in the past. Women who have never been pregnant, who have taken oestrogen for more than 10 years are also at a higher risk. Nowadays genetic testing can be done in high risk families and if the patient tests positive for the BRCA I & II gene (associated with breast cancer), she is at high risk for ovarian and breast cancer. Increased use of fertility drugs, using talcum powder near the vagina and obesity are also risk factors.

The use of oral contraceptive pills, however, reduces the risk of ovarian cancer while the removal of ovaries during hysterectomy prevents later development. Ovarian cancer is very dangerous as it is not easily diagnosed till an advanced stage. The only symptoms may be heaviness and bloating in the stomach, gas, nausea, or diarrhoea. Sometimes irregular vaginal bleeding may be seen.

The diagnosis is made by a pelvic examination, sonography, blood test such as CA 125 and MRI and treatment usually involves a major surgery — to remove the uterus, tubes, ovaries and the surrounding tissue — followed by chemotherapy.

Cancer of the uterus occurs more often in obese, diabetic women after age 40. Women who have suffered from polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) when young and had delayed periods for a long time without treatment are more prone. Women who menstruated early and had late menopause, infertility or a past history of breast or ovarian cancer are at a higher risk.

First Sign

Usually, the cancer is preceded by endometrial hyperplasia or thickness of the womb lining, which is non-cancerous. If diagnosis can be made early using sonography, the development can be prevented by use of hormonal medicines or a hysterectomy. However, if not picked up early, hyperplasia may progress to cancer. The symptoms are irregular bleeding, post-menopausal bleeding, pain or lump in lower abdomen or weight loss. The final confirmation is done by an endometrial biopsy or D&C or a hysteroscopy.

The treatment is essentially surgical involving removal of the womb, tubes, ovaries and surrounding tissue. Hormone therapy, radiation and chemotherapy may be required in some cases.

Breast cancer is one of the commonest cancers in women but the cause remains unknown. However about 10 per cent may be due to genetic causes. Women bearing a defective breast cancer associated gene (BRCA I & II) are at an increased risk. Women who start their periods early and have late menopause andlate pregnancy or those who have never had children are also at high risk. Long-term use of HRT may increase the risk.

The importance of regular breast self-examination cannot be over-emphasised. An annual mammography and sonography after the age of 40 will help pick up the problem early and simplify treatment. If there is a suspicious area on mammography, a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAC) or open biopsy will confirm the diagnosis.

The treatment is usually surgical. In early stages, a lumpectomy with sampling of lymph nodes while saving the breast may be sufficient but in later stages a mastectomy or removal of the breast may be necessary. Often radiation or chemotherapy is necessary after surgery. Hormone-dependent breast cancers often need hormone blocking drugs after surgery.

“As I see it, everyday you do one of two things: build health or produce disease in yourself.” Adelle Davis

CAP warns of ovarian cancer risk in talcum powder

Friday, February 12th, 2010

GEORGE TOWN, Malaysia: Instead of using talcum powder which poses health risks, consumers should use traditional bedak sejuk (rice talcum), says the Consumers Association of Penang (CAP).

The association made the call following findings in the United States that suggest that women who use talcum powder are 40% more likely to suffer from ovarian cancer.

CAP president S.M. Mohd Idris said bedak sejuk (powder made from rice flour) and powder made from corn flour were good alternatives to talcum powder.

He cited a study from the Harvard Medical School in the United States that found, from a sample of more than 3,000 women, that those using talcum once a week had a 36% higher risk of getting ovarian cancer while those using talcum daily faced a 41% higher risk.

A website that provides medical news, www.news-medical.net, reported that the study also revealed that the risk was greater still for those with a certain genetic profile.

The study’s lead researcher, Dr Maggie Gates, was also reported as saying that women should avoid using talcum powder in the genital area until more research was done,

Mohd Idris told a press conference yesterday that, despite the dangers associated with talcum powder, there were numerous talcum powder products in the market.

Some of these products were also baby products, he said.

“The majority of talcum products are being produced by well-known players in the industry and consumers buy them as they love the feel of talcum on their skin,” he added.

“Powder is an effective absorbent to help deodorise and imparts a silky touch.”

Mohd Idris said the primary component in talcum powder is magnesium silicate hydroxide, also commonly known as talc, which is the main ingredient in baby, medicated and designer perfumed body powder.

“Talc particles are capable of moving up the reproductive system and being embedded in the ovary lining,” he said.

“Researchers have found talc particles in ovarian tumour and they have also discovered that women with ovarian cancer used talcum powder on their genitals more frequently than healthy women.”

He urged the Health Ministry to place a warning on products containing talc and to stop the marketing of baby powder containing talc. -The Star/ANN

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Hotline – 1 (866) 952-1422

Attorney R. Allen Smith, Jr., of The Talc Litigation Group, filed the very first talcum ovarian cancer lawsuit on December 7, 2009. This talcum powder ovarian cancer lawsuit seeks damages against several talcum powder mining companies, refiners, manufacturers and product distributors for continuing to manufacture, market, and sell a product that has been medically proven to cause cancers such as ovarian cancer. Talc Litigation Group offers a free talcum powder cancer case review and ovarian cancer screenings in all 50 states.

Talcum powder and ovarian cancer

Friday, February 12th, 2010

EVERY now and then, I will receive a forwarded e-mail in my inbox, warning me about a domestic product or food that will “definitely cause cancer”!

Just the other day, I received one linking talcum powder to cancer. I have also had several patients ask me if it is true that talcum power can cause ovarian cancer.

The truth is, the scientific research in this area has produced sketchy results. Some studies have suggested a higher risk of ovarian cancer among women who use talcum powder in the genital area, although these studies cannot conclusively prove cause and effect.

But before we talk about the results of the research, let’s look at the components of talcum powder and how the link to cancer has come about.

What is talcum?

Talcum powder is produced from “talc”, a magnesium trisilicate mineral. In its natural form, this mineral may contain minute fibres that are very similar to asbestos. I am sure that all readers are familiar with asbestos, which is known to be a carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer).

Asbestos, which has been infamously used in paint, can cause lung cancer and mesotheliomas. Now widely acknowledged to be toxic, asbestos has been banned in many materials, including building and construction materials.

In 1973, the US Food and Drug Administration drafted a resolution to limit the amount of asbestos-like fibres in cosmetic-grade talc. However, no ruling has ever been made – so cosmetic-grade talc is still unregulated.

Before the readers jump to conclusions, however, we should remember that not necessarily every grain of talcum powder is carcinogenic – it depends on the level of asbestos-like fibres in the talc used.

Research on talcum powder and humans

Leaving aside the question of carcinogenic contents, let us cast a critical eye over the research results.

It has been suggested that talcum powder may lead to an increased risk of ovarian cancer, through the migration of talcum powder particles (applied to the genital area, sanitary napkins, diaphragms or condoms) through the vagina, uterus and fallopian tubes to the ovaries.

Several epidemiologic studies have been carried out to investigate this relationship. As I mentioned earlier, the results have been inconsistent. One case-control study published in 1997 found that the 300-odd women subjects with ovarian cancer were more likely to have applied talcum powder to their external genital area or used genital deodorant sprays. This suggests an association, although not a cause-and-effect.

Another prospective study published in 2000, which is considered to generally be the most informative study, found no effect on ovarian cancer overall. However, the study did discover that the use of talcum powder caused a 40% increased risk in one type of ovarian cancer – invasive serous cancer.

One large meta-analysis (a study that reanalyses data from many other studies) looked at results from 16 studies published prior to 2003. This analysis found a 33% increase in ovarian risk among talc users. However, women with the highest exposure to talc were at no greater risk than those with lower exposure, thus calling into question the validity of the so-called association.

A recent study has found an overall 37% increased risk among talc users, particularly among women who had not had a tubal ligation (a method of contraception that involves “tying” the fallopian tubes).

As you can see, all the studies described above provide different conclusions about the link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer. There is no study so far that can conclusively say that talcum powder CAUSES cancer.

What this means for you

The reason I am writing about this today is to clear up the misconceptions and fears surrounding this issue. It is all too easy to be alarmed and panicked when you receive a horror e-mail with “real-life” testimonies. The next thing you know, you are throwing all your bottles of body and facial powder into the garbage bin and vowing to boycott these products forever.

However, it is very important to understand the science behind it and evaluate the issue objectively. In this article, I have tried to demonstrate that just because there APPEARS to be an association, it does not necessarily equate to cause-and-effect.

The truth is, only a very small minority of women who have used talcum powder will ever develop ovarian cancer. More importantly, it is impossible to say how much talcum use had contributed to these cases – had these women used talcum powder on their genital area every day of their lives, or only occasionally? Nobody can answer that.

Until scientific research can give us better answers, it is up to the individual to make the decision for herself.

Certainly, a safer choice would be to avoid the regular use of talcum powder for genital hygiene, and to avoid dusting it on sanitary pads, condoms or other products that are used in contact with the genital area.

One alternative is to use corn starch-based powders that do not contain talc. Corn starch has not been linked to any form of cancer and is more readily broken down by the body, unlike talc.

Consult your paediatrician about whether it is safe to use baby talcum for your infants and young children.

Finally, it is always best to show the product to an expert – your family physician, gynaecologist or pharmacist – and ask for advice. There is no need to jump to your own conclusions based on an anonymous forwarded e-mail.

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Hotline – 1 (866) 952-1422

Attorney R. Allen Smith, Jr., of The Talc Litigation Group, filed the very first talcum ovarian cancer lawsuit on December 7, 2009. This talcum powder ovarian cancer lawsuit seeks damages against several talcum powder mining companies, refiners, manufacturers and product distributors for continuing to manufacture, market, and sell a product that has been medically proven to cause cancers such as ovarian cancer. Talc Litigation Group offers a free talcum powder cancer case review and ovarian cancer screenings in all 50 states.

  • Datuk Dr Nor Ashikin Mokhtar is a consultant obstetrician & gynaecologist (FRCOG, UK). For further information, visit www.primanora.com. The information provided is for educational and communication purposes only and it should not be construed as personal medical advice. Information published in this article is not intended to replace, supplant or augment a consultation with a health professional regarding the reader’s own medical care. The Star does not give any warranty on accuracy, completeness, functionality, usefulness or other assurances as to the content appearing in this column. The Star disclaims all responsibility for any losses, damage to property or personal injury suffered directly or indirectly from reliance on such information.

Cancer warning for talcum powder

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

GEORGE TOWN: Be careful the next time you sprinkle yourself with talcum powder or inhale it as it has been found to cause cancers and tumours, said the Consumers’ Association of Penang (CAP).

Magnesium silicate hydroxide, also commonly known as talc, is the main ingredient in baby, medicated and designer perfumed body powder.

CAP president S.M. Mohamed Idris said the latest findings from the United States suggested that women who used talcum powder were 40% more likely to suffer from ovarian cancer.

“Talc particles are capable of moving up the reproductive system and becoming embedded in the ovary lining.

“Researchers have found talc particles in ovarian tumour and they have also discovered that women with ovarian cancer used talcum powder on their genitals more frequently than healthy women,” he told a press conference at the CAP headquarters here Tuesday.

He said that researchers from Harvard Medical School in Boston studied over 3,000 women and found that those using talcum once a week had a 36% chance of getting ovarian cancer, while those using talcum daily had a 41% chance.

Talcum, Mohamed Idris added, was also a health risk when exposed to the lungs as the puffy white cloud of powder ended up being inhaled by babies.

“Talc can cause the baby’s airways to swell and lead to pneumonia, and has been linked to asthma in children. Statistics show that several thousands infants die or become seriously ill each year due to inhalation of baby powder,” he said.

He urged the Health Ministry to place a warning on products containing talc and to stop the marketing of baby powder containing talc.

“Consumers should revert to using the traditional ‘bedak sejuk,’ which is made of rice flour or powder made from corn flour,” he added.